NYSESLAT’18 done…or is it??

6th Grade Team, 7th Grade Team, 8th Grade Team, Art Teachers, ELA Teachers, Great Pedagogy, Health + P.E. Teachers, Math Teachers, Science Teachers, Social Studies Teachers
Special "thank you's" to everyone who supported ELLs during the NYSESLAT'18...from bucket notes to grading, to every encouragement in between! ELLs need much more support in classrooms. Here's why: Scoring take aways: The writing rubric used to score exams exceeds what ELLs do in ELA classrooms The R.A.C.E. response inculcated into written responses school-wide partially help ELLs respond to prompts that require opinions and personal anecdotes (which are graded down on the ELA exam!) Implication: More ELLs are "trapped" in ENL because they can not pass the NYSESLAT The longer ELLs are in ENL, the higher the chance of dropping out of school (infographic). This is a nation-wide issue affecting education and society.   To improve this inequity: I created a study group in Sep 2017 called "Preempting Long Term ELLs" with NYC Men…
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Three Stages of Understanding

6th Grade Team, 7th Grade Team, 8th Grade Team, Art Teachers, ELA Teachers, Health + P.E. Teachers, Math Teachers, Science Teachers, Social Studies Teachers
The Three Stages of the Understand Level* Students restate information in their own words to show they understand the information. In this example, students identify what led up to the revolution, framing the context for the revolt: What? So What? Now What? What led to the colonists’ revolt against Britain? Why was this revolt important? What effect has the American Rev had on the U.S. and Britain? One reason is increasing numbers of immigrants from other nations. It led to the foundation and formation of the United States. The U.S. and Britain have since been very strong allies. How did this strategy work for you?   (*From "A Framework for Thinking: Digging Deeper into Bloom's Taxonomy")
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Learning Connections

6th Grade Team, 7th Grade Team, 8th Grade Team
In our study group on the adolescent brains, we learned in the article “Teaching & the Adolescent Brain” (Schenk) that learning happens with “consolidated learning connections”. Our 756-Word Campaign (to close the vocab gap) hits these 5 components of learning. Thank you for your suggestions so far: Acquisition of stimuli (when new words are introduced, patterns result, Neural connection (made via connecting new to background knowledge when students draw or write their own definitions), Consolidation (created by the stability of repetition, writing in notebook), Dynamic relationships (when students hear and use new words across the curriculum, Retrievable memory (as students see words on word walls in hallways and classrooms).  
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3 Tools You Need to Teach ELLs

6th Grade Team, 7th Grade Team, 8th Grade Team, Art Teachers, ELA Teachers, Health + P.E. Teachers, Math Teachers, Science Teachers, Social Studies Teachers
*New* in ELL this week involves 3 valuable information sources: This is a super-short, but informative survey. It only takes only 3 minutes to complete (I know because two teachers volunteered to test it :). Check it out here. After you do that, check out this is a fun, 1 minute video featuring The 8 Steps for the Perfect Lesson for ELLs. The 8 Steps are to help you, as content teachers plan instruction. Last, you can look at the newly updated Collaboration & Data page for an explanation of the data groups, because when you're ready to plan, you can get the coveted ELL Data Sheet at Using Data, CCSS, & NLAP. You can use them all to reach ELLs at their Language Access point as you teach them at their Content Access point.  
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Content-Specific ELL Strategies

Content-Specific ELL Strategies

6th Grade Team, 7th Grade Team, 8th Grade Team, Art Teachers, Health + P.E. Teachers
We have a huge population of ELLs and Former ELLs. Try these strategies featured in the educational sites at Stanford University and TeachingChannel: ELA Teaching Resources (Stanford U) for Persuasion Across Time and Space Math Teaching Resources (Stanford U) features Task-Making Matchsticks. Notice how they need to describe what a matchstick even before instruction begins. Science Teaching Resources (Stanford U) where you may have seen Valdes and Quinn's research on the overlapping domains of ELA/Math/Science when teaching Science. Social Studies Teaching Videos (TeachingChannel) has myriad advice. Art Teaching Videos (TeachingChannel) has a plethora of lesson suggestions. PE/Health teachers: These featured sites do not have specific PE/Health sections, however, SHLA ENL lesson this week is on "Symptoms of Illness" where students learn 10-12 names of human body parts and the expression "My _____s hurt". Practice question: "What hurts?" Have a great week and…
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Board for Word Project

6th Grade Team, 7th Grade Team, 8th Grade Team, Art Teachers, Health + P.E. Teachers
Bulletin Board for Vocabulary Super-special shout out to the following: Ms. Perez for suggesting a visible, high-traffic area for the Tier 2 words; Ms. Barenback and the Student Support Team for offering the 3rd floor board for this school-wide project and staples; Ms. Corrick for collecting the words this month; teachers around the 3rd floor who saw the birth of the bulletin board. It's a work-in-progress, so you'll see more changes as it evolves.
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Hone Our Craft

6th Grade Team, 7th Grade Team, 8th Grade Team, Art Teachers, Health + P.E. Teachers
The Teaching Channel It's nice to know that we have video sources online that can help us hone our teaching craft. The teachingchannel.org site has over 1,000 videos about all aspects of learning. You might have to join (for free) to access this site, but it's worth getting that vital information you need. They even have videos on teaching ELLs, so I'll be checking it out and tell us what you think!
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ELL Ideas at Bi-Lingual Fair

6th Grade Team, 7th Grade Team, 8th Grade Team
At the Bilingual Fair at Hunter College, I learned so much information about teaching ELLs! Some takeaways for you (in no order): Teachers benefit from learning about students’ cultural and linguistic backgrounds by becoming culturally sensitive and gaining knowledge about another language. (Ircania Stylianou, Dual Lang Dept, DoE) The natural “turning points” in language acquisition”: At <3 years, babies can learn unlimited languages; at 9 months they can discriminate sounds (phonemes). Then at 3-6 years, children can learn 3-4 languages at the same time. Then at 6+ years, children can learn one at a time; before 13 years, children can become accent-free in other languages; after 13 years, children learn a language with an accent. Parents can give their children this gift of other languages by starting them out early: Speak to them in your language,…
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